big girls in hip hop videos.

i’m supposed to be at work, but whatever.

de la soul’s “baby phat.”

i can’t think of any others, actually.
i’ll be back later to wrote more.

Advertisements

the world’s oldest profession.

i watched cathouse the other night.

tonight, i’m watching hookers at the point.

do i even need to go into detail about the glaringly obvious differences? nearly all of the women featured from dennis hof’s bunny ranch are white. they’re in reno. rural, kind of. the women at the point are brown. latin. black. a white girl here & there. it’s mindblowing. they’re not safe. the cameras on them are from a film crew, not a closed-circuit surveillance system. if something’s ‘not okay’ for the women at the point, they’re on their own. so many disparities. i don’t even think the women at the bunny ranch come exclusively from a position of privilege — rather, their choices to become sex workers seem to be motivated by pleasure, rather than a drug habit or the needs of hungry kids @ home. these women get $1,000 for an hour of their time. the women at the point? one tenth of that if they make demands & stand their ground. i don’t know how much of that is clever editing, & how much of it is fact. there’s a lot at play. sex workers aren’t necessarily born sex workers. but the disparities that i see between the two groups are many, & vast.

*sigh*

and then i see this over at angry brown butch. and this at feministe. i have no words. my heart breaks to know that the names of people who should — just like every fucking body else, be uplifted as they are remembered for their lives — are having their names twisted in death. it’s fucked up. it’s wrong. it hurts my feelings. how could panic be an acceptable excuse? i panicked, SO I KILLED HER. what? really? wow. panic has caused me to lock myself out of my apartment. panic has made me drop shit on the floor. panic has never, ever, EVER caused me to kill someone.
& for fuck’s sake, if we could all cry misrepresentation as a reason to kill . . . i would have murdered no fewer than 5 men i’ve had sex with, one woman i used to be friends with . . . & my own father.
let’s be for real. calling someone a prostitute (whether they were or not) somehow magically justifies it, if you follow what’s been reported. no. i’m not buying it.

excuses aren’t gonna soothe the broken hearts of mothers
no explanation given could ever make enough sense of this shit. someone threw away your baby’s life because of what? because they were mistaken about who your child was? no.

someone told me today: when ppl attend your funeral, their wailing is meant to be loud so that it’s known in heaven that you were/ are loved.
i definitely hope that these loved & lost ones continue to be spoken of.

swagger jacked

from the butch caucus
(it wouldn’t let me customize the title i wanted, so i chose ninja instead of typing in “boocakes,” “jawn,” or “jumpoff”)

come be my boocakes!

and you know i’m dead ass serious, right?

for aj.

via the trantasia flickr album:

silence still won’t protect you:

some links to feed your inner (or outer) revolutionary:

the sakia gunn film project

black./womyn conversations on blogspot & youtube (i’m SO mad i missed the philly screening)

brokenbeautiful press

no snow here

the butch caucus

happy reading!

get them out.

(links via darkdaughta’s blog post on the matter)

In the summer of 2006, seven young Black lesbians from New Jersey—Patreese Johnson, Renata Hill, Venice Brown, Terrain Dandridge, Chenese Loyal, Lania Daniels, and Khamysha Coates—were hanging out on the pier in New York City’s West Village when Dwayne Buckle, a man selling DVDs on the street, sexually propositioned Patreese. Refusing to take no for an answer, he followed them down the street, insulting and threatening them: “I’ll **** you straight, sweetheart!”

It is important to understand that all seven women knew of another young woman named Sakia Gunn, who had been stabbed to death under very similar circumstances—by a pair of highly aggressive, verbally abusive male strangers. At least some of the seven had known Sakia personally.

During the resulting confrontation, Buckle first spat in Renata’s face and threw his lit cigarette at her, then he yanked another’s hair, pulling her towards him, and then began strangling Renata. A fight broke out, during which Patreese Johnson, 4 feet 11 inches tall and 95 pounds, produced a small knife from her bag to stop Buckle from choking her friend—a knife she carried to protect herself when she came home alone from her late-night job.

Two male onlookers, one of whom had a knife, ran over to physically deal with Buckle in order to help the women. Buckle, who ended up hospitalized for five days with stomach and liver lacerations, initially reported on at least two occasions that the men—not the women—had attacked him. What’s more, Patreese’s knife was never tested for DNA, the men who beat Buckle were never questioned by police, and the whole incident was captured on surveillance video. Yet the women ended up on trial for attempted murder. Dwayne Buckle testified against them.

The media coverage was savage, calling the women such things as a “wolf pack of lesbians.” The pro bono lawyers for the young lesbians would later have to buy the public record of the case since the judge, Edward J. McLaughlin (who openly taunted and expressed contempt for the women in front of the jury all throughout the trial), would not release it. As of late August 2007, the defense team still didn’t have a copy of the security camera video footage. And after the better part of one year spent sitting in jail, four of the seven women were sentenced in June 2007—reportedly by an all-white jury of mostly women—to jail terms ranging from 3 1/2 to 11 years. The oldest of the women was 24, and two of them are mothers of small children.

the website

contact the 4 who remain incarcerated
contact the governor and demand their release
sign the petition

it’s easy to try to forget, but every day there’s evidence of how little the lives of black women mean to the world around us.
do what you can to speak out against this wrongdoing. bring these women home.

i don’t think i’m supposed to laugh at this.

but this blog is hilarious to me.

Previous Older Entries